Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

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Deuteronomy 8:3

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism

Place your emphasis on that commandment or other part of the catechism that suffers the greatest neglect among your people. For instance, stress the Seventh Commandment, concerning stealing, among laborers and merchants, and even farmers and servants, for many of them are guilty of dishonesty and theft. Just so, emphasize the Fourth Commandment among the children and the common people so that they may lead orderly, faithful, obedient, and peaceful lives. Offer many examples from the Scriptures to show how God has punished or blessed such persons.

Pulling It Together

You will find different areas of stress in your ministry—whether it be a commandment, article, petition, or Sacrament that needs emphasis in the lives of your flock, or in your own life. Do not ignore where the Holy Spirit is speaking to you. As you teach, you will find that the doors of the catechism swing outward and inward too.

Prayer: Feed me with your word, Lord. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

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Today, the reliability of the Gospel is questioned or denied by many voices, inside and outside the Church. But if we, as Christians, have only "hoped" in Christ, and do not see Him as reliable, then we are "most to be pitied." This series by As We Go Ministries examines the reliability of central claims of the Christian faith, including the truth of Scripture, the promise of the Gospel, and the certainty of Christ's death and resurrection for our sake. 

The series requires the accompanying video DVD featuring the pastors of Faith Lutheran Church, in Hutchinson, Minnesota: the Rev. Scott Grorud and the Rev. David Wollan. 

Click the thumbnails for product descriptions and ordering details. 

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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Original image  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

Philippians 3:10

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

Then, after you have taught them this condensed catechism, take up a large catechism, and give them a richer and fuller understanding. Expand on the meaning of each commandment, petition, and article, with its various uses, benefits, dangers, and difficulties, as you will find these abundantly discussed in many books written about these topics. 

Pulling It Together

It is inconceivable that a person would say of the one she loves, I’ve had enough of him; it’s time for a new stage of life. Even so, being Christian is not something that finally happens, or a chapter of life from which one graduates. Being a Christian means following Christ for one’s entire life, and with one’s whole life. And the reason for this is clear: you want to know him more and more. A Christian wants to know Jesus with more than head-knowledge; she desires heart-knowledge. She wants an intimate relationship with Christ. That does not happen in a brief span of time. It happens over a lifetime.

So, we do not begin and end with the teachings in The Small Catechism. We move on to larger and deeper things. We move through a life together, one grace after another, growing up in salvation (1 Pet 2:2), so that we may more fully know him whom we love.

Prayer: I want to know you, Lord. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

   

Written in honor of the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation, The Life of Martin Luthera nine-session adult study, takes participants through the circumstances and events of the life of Martin Luther as it reflects on the biblical themes underlying the Lutheran Reformation. 

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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Original image  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

Philippians 3:10

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

Then, after you have taught them this condensed catechism, take up a large catechism, and give them a richer and fuller understanding. Expand on the meaning of each commandment, petition, and article, with its various uses, benefits, dangers, and difficulties, as you will find these abundantly discussed in many books written about these topics. 

Pulling It Together

It is inconceivable that a person would say of the one she loves, I’ve had enough of him; it’s time for a new stage of life. Even so, being Christian is not something that finally happens, or a chapter of life from which one graduates. Being a Christian means following Christ for one’s entire life, and with one’s whole life. And the reason for this is clear: you want to know him more and more. A Christian wants to know Jesus with more than head-knowledge; she desires heart-knowledge. She wants an intimate relationship with Christ. That does not happen in a brief span of time. It happens over a lifetime.

So, we do not begin and end with the teachings in The Small Catechism. We move on to larger and deeper things. We move through a life together, one grace after another, growing up in salvation (1 Pet 2:2), so that we may more fully know him whom we love.

Prayer: I want to know you, Lord. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

   

Written in honor of the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation, The Life of Martin Luthera nine-session adult study, takes participants through the circumstances and events of the life of Martin Luther as it reflects on the biblical themes underlying the Lutheran Reformation. 

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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

Psalm 119:130

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

After they have learned the text, teach them the meaning too. Again, choose the explanations in this booklet, or some other brief, uniform explanations, whichever you like, and adhere to it. As stated earlier regarding the text, do not change a single syllable. Furthermore, take your time to present the parts one at a time. It is not necessary that you present all of them at once. After they correctly understand the First Commandment, then take up the Second, and so on. Otherwise, they will be too overwhelmed to retain anything properly.

Pulling It Together

God’s word opens the door of the mind. Yet it does far more since it is not merely that which opens, but is itself the gateway to a person’s spirit. For this part of a person (1 Thes 5:23) to properly develop, it must do so under the regenerative power of the Holy Spirit. It is God, through his Word, who recreates us in his own image. But how does he do this regenerative work? Scripture is clear. “Beloved, we are God’s children now; it does not yet appear what we shall be, but we know that when he appears we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is” (1 John 3:2 RSV). Where does God reveal himself most objectively than through Christ Jesus, and thus, through Scripture? It is through seeing God in Scripture that we begin to become like him, finally becoming like him in glory on that Day.

Seeing God begins with being taught these basic verses and explanations found in the Small Catechism. The Spirit of God uses that Word to begin a transformative process, a regeneration of the whole person. The person who keeps faith in Christ—effectively taught and learned in the Ten Commandments, the Lord’s Prayer, the Sacraments, and the Creed—is the one who will become like God, fully having his righteousness and eternal life, even as believers enjoy now by faith. He will fully reveal to you that which you have already been given through faith in Christ.

Prayer: Give me, O God, a confident hope of glory, through Jesus Christ. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

   

Today, the reliability of the Gospel is questioned or denied by many voices, inside and outside the Church. But if we, as Christians, have only "hoped" in Christ, and do not see Him as reliable, then we are "most to be pitied." This series by As We Go Ministries examines the reliability of central claims of the Christian faith, including the truth of Scripture, the promise of the Gospel, and the certainty of Christ's death and resurrection for our sake. 

This series requires the accompanying video DVD featuring the pastors of Faith Lutheran Church, in Hutchinson Minnesota: the Rev. Scott Grorud and the Rev. David Wollan. 

Click the thumbnails for product descriptions and ordering details. 

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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Original image  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

Deuteronomy 11:18–19

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

Although we cannot and should not force anyone to believe, we should nonetheless insist that the people know what is right and wrong according to those among whom they live and desire to make their living. For whoever desires to reside in a town must know and observe the town laws whose protection he wishes to enjoy, no matter whether he is a believer or, at heart and in private, a troublemaker or crook.

Pulling It Together

Too often, we hear something along this line: We have decided to let our children make up their own minds. All the while, the rest of the world has free access to the minds of these same children. Then parents wonder why their children grow up to be unproductive or worse. They wonder if they had raised these now adult children, or say things like, We didn’t raise them to be like this. Well, yes, you did.

You are not forcing anyone to believe by teaching the catechism, or for that matter spelling or science. You are providing adequate tools for the future. One cannot make up a mind, if that part of the mind is deficient. Having never taught them to spell, we would be quite foolish to imagine our children could get along in society by choosing to spell words with whatever combination of letters they decided should be used. Having never allowed them to be taught any science, we would be poor parents indeed, who allowed our children to go up a ladder and learn about gravity the hard way.

You cannot force anyone to believe, but you can supply the tools and information necessary to, at very least, live a moral life—if not one that is godly.

Prayer: Give me the courage to be a responsible Christian, Lord. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

  

Click any of the covers for these new overviews of the
Old and New Testaments, with separate Leader's Guides.

  

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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Original image  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

Deuteronomy 11:18–19

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

Although we cannot and should not force anyone to believe, we should nonetheless insist that the people know what is right and wrong according to those among whom they live and desire to make their living. For whoever desires to reside in a town must know and observe the town laws whose protection he wishes to enjoy, no matter whether he is a believer or, at heart and in private, a troublemaker or crook.

Pulling It Together

Too often, we hear something along this line: We have decided to let our children make up their own minds. All the while, the rest of the world has free access to the minds of these same children. Then parents wonder why their children grow up to be unproductive or worse. They wonder if they had raised these now adult children, or say things like, We didn’t raise them to be like this. Well, yes, you did.

You are not forcing anyone to believe by teaching the catechism, or for that matter spelling or science. You are providing adequate tools for the future. One cannot make up a mind, if that part of the mind is deficient. Having never taught them to spell, we would be quite foolish to imagine our children could get along in society by choosing to spell words with whatever combination of letters they decided should be used. Having never allowed them to be taught any science, we would be poor parents indeed, who allowed our children to go up a ladder and learn about gravity the hard way.

You cannot force anyone to believe, but you can supply the tools and information necessary to, at very least, live a moral life—if not one that is godly.

Prayer: Give me the courage to be a responsible Christian, Lord. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

  

Click any of the covers for these new overviews of the
Old and New Testaments, with separate Leader's Guides.

  

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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

John 8:36

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

Those who are unwilling to learn it should be told that they deny Christ and are not Christians. They should not be admitted to the Sacrament, be sponsors at baptisms, nor enjoy any part of Christian liberty. Simply return them to the pope and his officials, indeed, to the devil himself. Moreover, their parents and employers should refuse them food and drink, and notify them that the prince will drive such crude people from the country, etc.

Pulling It Together

The point here is that our people are to take the catechism seriously. But why?, one might object. It’s only some program Luther invented. First, there were many catechisms before Luther (and since). Second, and most importantly, when Luther’s Small Catechism is taught correctly, Christians learn to follow Christ instead of religion. In other words, the catechism teaches us and will thereafter remind us that it is Christ who sets us free of sin and death—of the devil too. If people are unwilling to learn about God’s grace, we may as well be done with them.   

Prayer: I want to follow you, Lord. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

The Minor Prophets in Sola's "Old Places, New Faces" series is a twelve lesson study that peeks at each of the dozen books we call the minor prophets, books that are often forgotten or neglected. Yet, their messages are deeply relevant for today's believer. The prophetical books contain God's call upon His followers of every century. These exhortations are either calls to positive actions that honor God or warnings to stop attitudes and behaviors that dishonor Him. As we rediscover these profound words, we will be reminded of what it means to follow and obey God, as well as be challenged to live a life that glorifies God in greater and more significant ways.

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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

John 8:36

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

Those who are unwilling to learn it should be told that they deny Christ and are not Christians. They should not be admitted to the Sacrament, be sponsors at baptisms, nor enjoy any part of Christian liberty. Simply return them to the pope and his officials, indeed, to the devil himself. Moreover, their parents and employers should refuse them food and drink, and notify them that the prince will drive such crude people from the country, etc.

Pulling It Together

The point here is that our people are to take the catechism seriously. But why?, one might object. It’s only some program Luther invented. First, there were many catechisms before Luther (and since). Second, and most importantly, when Luther’s Small Catechism is taught correctly, Christians learn to follow Christ instead of religion. In other words, the catechism teaches us and will thereafter remind us that it is Christ who sets us free of sin and death—of the devil too. If people are unwilling to learn about God’s grace, we may as well be done with them.   

Prayer: I want to follow you, Lord. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

The Minor Prophets in Sola's "Old Places, New Faces" series is a twelve lesson study that peeks at each of the dozen books we call the minor prophets, books that are often forgotten or neglected. Yet, their messages are deeply relevant for today's believer. The prophetical books contain God's call upon His followers of every century. These exhortations are either calls to positive actions that honor God or warnings to stop attitudes and behaviors that dishonor Him. As we rediscover these profound words, we will be reminded of what it means to follow and obey God, as well as be challenged to live a life that glorifies God in greater and more significant ways.

Comments Off on Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

Deuteronomy 11:18–19

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

Choose the version you like, and stick with it thereafter. But when you preach in the presence of educated and intelligent people, you may exhibit your knowledge, and present the parts of the catechism in varied and sophisticated ways, giving them as masterful a turn as you are able. But when teaching the young, stick to one, fixed, permanent form and manner. Begin with these parts: the Ten Commandments, the Creed, the Lord’s Prayer, etc. Match the text word for word, so that they can repeat these parts in the same way after you and commit them to memory.

Pulling It Together

What does it mean to “impress” the word of God on your heart and soul but to memorize Scripture? Other translations use “place,” “deposit,” “lay up,” and “fix.” It all means the same thing: know the Word. We begin with foundational Scripture, teaching our youth, not only these verses that will prove helpful for a lifetime but also, the discipline of memorizing more Scripture as they mature in the faith. Do not be worried about expecting memorization; it is a beneficial exercise and one that God commands.  

Prayer: Help me, O God, to meditate in your Word day and night. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

Where does the Bible come from? Who decided what should be included in it? How do we know it is reliable? Why should we even care what it says? And even if we do care, how can we make sense of of such a big and confusing book? Author and pastor Tom Hilpert takes readers on a journey of discovery through the world's best-selling and most-printed book. Written in clear, understandable language, Who Cares About the Bible? tackles the most important questions concerning this unique book. It is an excellent primer for anyone interested in what the Bible is, how to properly understand it, and how to deal with the vast amount of misleading information that has been spread about it.

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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions

Click above for larger graphic.  • Original image  • Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference

  Click for a recording of today's lesson. 

Proverbs 22:6

From the Confessions: The Small Catechism 

Our blessed fathers understood this well, for they used the same form of the Lord’s Prayer, the Creed, and the Ten Commandments. Therefore, we should also teach the catechism to the young and untrained in such a way that we do not vary a syllable, not presenting or reciting them differently from one year to the next.

Pulling It Together

What a privilege we have been afforded, that God would entrust to his church the training of young disciples. Like Jesus, we might say to any child or youth, “Follow me.” Of course, they do not simply follow us to a Sunday School room where we teach them to memorize the catechism. We are showing them how we live the catechism, so that they will follow our example.

Prayer: Help me, Lord Jesus, to do my part in your church. Amen.

Click here for resources to learn the Ten Commandments.

Receive these daily Sola Devotions by email. Write mryman@solapublishing.com with "Subscribe" as your subject. To unsubscribe, send an email to the same address with "Unsubscribe" as your subject.

In Prayer as Joy, Prayer as Struggle, Mark Braaten explores many types of prayer, including thanksgiving, confession, praise, wrestling, petition, intercession, listening, and hope. He also explores what it means when the answer to prayer is "no" and how we experience prayer in times of doubt. In each chapter, he uses and extended biblical example of prayer and also provides the text of prayers we can use in our own practice. For all who seek joy in prayer, even as we struggle, Braaten offers an engaging personal and pastoral reflection on the ways we pray.

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